Saturday, March 1, 2014

Gaucho Knives

I'm not working at the dump anymore.  I got a better job with better pay in a better environment.  However, I have a buddy that still works there and he's picking the pile for me. We split the proceeds.  He called me and told me he had some old cutlery.  I've never had luck with selling cutlery, unless it's hunting knives.  



I was pleased when he brought me the load (other things will be posted soon). I didn't know what they were, so I looked for identifying marks and did an internet search.


These are gaucho daggers .  What are gaucho knives?







10 comments:

  1. They do look like handles and sheaths are silver.

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  2. Those old Mexican cowboys were supposed to be pretty deadly with them. They were carried stuck in a sash around the waist.

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    1. Mexican?? a bit further down the map than that Gorges. The very bottom end of the continent, Argentina.

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    2. those gaucho knifes were manufactured in Argentina

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    3. those gaucho knifes were manufactured in Argentina

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  3. Yes, Argentine. Very similar to the cabelleros. I had no idea that they had their own kinds of knives. Interesting/cool. As a side note, we always called each other "comanchero" at the dump (we worked with a Mexican guy. Finally, one day, we all realized we didn't know what it meant! I had to come home and look it up!

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  4. As a Venezuelan native and 100% fluent in Spanish the term Comanchero is a new one to me. Had to look it up myself. But it should not surprise us. The colloquialisms throughout the Spanish speaking world vary just as much as in the English language even within the USA. And in sound and accent they vary as much. Think of a South Carolina accent vs a Scott vs a South African. Mexican Spanish as you would find mostly west of the Mississippi has its own unique verbiage. Argentinian is again a different animal. The culture is European, more so than any other in Latin America. They are Italians, genuine Guidos in every sense of the word, who speak Spanish and will out do any Frenchman in arrogance.
    As for the knifes they look like they may be valuable. Take a look at these:
    http://listado.mercadolibre.com.ar/cuchillo-atahualpa-tandil-industria-argentina-antiguo
    Prices are in Argentinian pesos, which are about 8 to a US $

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  5. I had no idea you were from Venezuela! I've seen you reply in Spanish on your blog, but didn't know the history behind it. When I was working at the dump, I tried learning some spanish from one of the workers. He was raised in Aguascalientes (I hope I didn't butcher that). My mother-in-law's family comes from Chihuahua. He would teach me a phrase in Spanish. I'd come home and say it to her and she would look at me like I had two heads! Even Maine has it's own variances. I wrote a paper in college on the different Maine accents. You can count 4-6 of them, depending on where you look and what variances you count.
    I've got the knives for sale on ebay right now. Not much action on them, but something is better than nothing. If I didn't have so many knives, I'd keep one for myself. However, with the ornate nature of the whole setup, I'd surely ruin it by working it too hard!

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    1. I think your Mexican co worker was yanking your chain and teaching you profanities... ha ha ha... no wonder your mother in law looked at you funny. Yes, born and raised in Venezuela. Though today you could not tell. Came to Maine when I was 16. Dad figured I was headed nowhere fast and sent me to Hebron Academy. Bit of a culture shock coming from Caracas a city of 3.5 million to west-overshoe Maine. 100% assimilated and an American citizen now, I have been here 34 years. In some ways I miss the place and would love to go back and visit, but I fear that wont be happening nay time soon. Looking at the news down there today I am glad I am here. I know what you say about the variances in Maine. A friend once said "you have your side hill gougers,(farm folk) and your hearing chokers" (fishermen).

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  6. Forgot to add regarding your question What are Gaucho knives?
    Mostly they are a cowhand's knife. Gauchos were the cattlemen of the southern plains. They do some wicked grilling. The knife was, in addition to a sign of pride and almost an accessory for the costume, a tool for the parrilla... the grill. For more on that google "Parrilla Argentina"
    more here on the variations of the gaucho knife
    http://www.ebay.com/gds/Basic-guide-to-know-the-Criollo-Knives-Gauchos-knife-/10000000000130772/g.html

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